Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Francisvale is participating in NBC10’s Clear the Shelters

Tuesday, July 19th, 2016

Francisvale is proud to be participating in NBC10’s Clear the Shelters Event this year.

If you are interested in adopting a dog or cat from Francisvale during this Event, please contact us at francisvaleadoptions@gmail.com or call us at 610-688-1018 for instructions on how to proceed.

Let’s all make this Event really successful by finding as many homes as we can for our furry friends!!

Here is some more information:

NBC10 PHILADELPHIA AND TELEMUNDO62 TO HOST SECOND ANNUAL PET ADOPTION DRIVE – CLEAR THE SHELTERS – ON SATURDAY, JULY 23

More Than 30 Animal Shelters from the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware Areas Will Offer No-Cost or Reduced Fee Adoptions or Waive Pet Spaying and Neutering Fees 

Visit NBC10.com and Telemundo62.com to Access Full List of Local Participating Animal Shelters 

BALA CYNWYD, PA – (July 19, 2016) – NBC10 Philadelphia / WCAU and Telemundo62 / WWSI and more than 30 animal shelters in the Philadelphia, South Jersey and Delaware areas will host the second annual Clear the Shelters pet adoption campaign on Saturday, July 23.  On this day, participating animal shelters in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, South Jersey and Delaware areas will offer no-cost or reduced fee adoptions or waive pet spaying and neutering fees. Clear the Shelters is an initiative spearheaded by the NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations, a division of NBCUniversal.

WHAT:              WCAU NBC10 Philadelphia / WWSI Telemundo62 will team up with more than 30 animal shelters in the Philadelphia, New Jersey, and Delaware areas to host Clear The Shelters on Saturday, July 23. On this day, participating animal shelters in will offer no-cost or reduced fee adoptions or waive pet spaying and neutering fees

WHEN:  Saturday, July 23 from 10AM to 4 PM

WHERE:           Participating animal shelters in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, South Jersey and Delaware. This year’s main shelter site is the Providence Animal Center. 555 Sandy Bank Road Media, Pennsylvania 19063

INFO:               For the full list of local participating animal shelters, viewers can visit NBC10.com and Telemundo62.com

ADOPTION:      A real-time pet “Adoption Tracker” – posted on ClearTheShelters.com – will

TRACKER         record the total number of pets that are adopted across all participating markets.

SOCIAL:           Use the hashtag #ClearTheShelters to follow the effort on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Clear the Shelters themed Snapchat filters will be activated on July 23. Spanish-language viewers can use the hashtag #DesocuparLosAlbergues 

ABOUT NBC10 PHILADELPHIA / WCAU

Owned by NBCUniversal, NBC10 Philadelphia has been delivering local news, information and weather for more than 60 years, serving nearly six million viewers throughout Greater Philadelphia, the Lehigh Valley, South Jersey and Delaware. Viewers turn to NBC10 for the most up-to-date breaking news and weather on a variety of platforms, including online at nbc10.com and via mobile and social platforms. COZI TV, the station’s multicast network, offers a full schedule of America’s most beloved and iconic television series and hit movies as well as local programming. COZI TV can be seen on Comcast channel 248, Verizon channel 460, RCN channel 28 and over-the-air on digital 10.2. 

ABOUT TELEMUNDO62 / WWSI

Owned by NBCUniversal, Telemundo62 / WWSI is NBC’s Owned Television Stations local station serving Spanish-speaking viewers throughout the greater Philadelphia area, including 18 counties across Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. In January 2014, the station launched Noticiero Telemundo62, a locally produced, live Spanish-language newscast, airing weekdays at 6 and 11 PM. Viewers turn to Noticiero Telemundo62 for authentically local news, weather, sports and community coverage and follow developing stories on the Telemundo62 app.

 

 

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Free Days with George by Colin Campbell

Saturday, May 14th, 2016

 

George's bus

We were so fortunate to have two very special guests stop by last week to visit us at Francisvale.  Author Colin Campbell, whose new book is entitled “Free Days with George”, and George, the fun loving and handsome Newfoundland, who Colin rescued from a shelter, both took time away from their very busy 25 city book tour to visit with our staff and our very own furries.  We had such a great time meeting with them and hearing stories about the amazing relationship and bond that they share.  Thank you Colin and George for spending some time at Francisvale, we loved having you both here!

Pedigree, who is sponsoring the tour, was kind enough to donate 800 pounds of dog food to Francisvale which was delivered the very next day.  THANK YOU PEDIGREE!!

Be sure to follow Colin and George on their Facebook Page as they continue to tour in style in their big bus. And, don’t forget to pick up a copy of Colin’s book Free Days with George for a moving and inspiring true story about how the love a dog can change your life.

HAPPY TRAILS TO COLIN AND GEORGE!!!

staff picture

Posted in Frontpage News, News

JOIN US FOR HUMANE LOBBY DAY !

Saturday, February 27th, 2016

Join us on April 4th, 2016 at the Pennsylvania State Capital in Harrisburg, PA and become a voice for all animals by talking with your legislators about passing laws to protect pets.  Get more details at the HSUS website.

 

SHAREGRAPHIC-HLD-2016 (2) humane day

Posted in Events, News

Friday, December 25th, 2015

shutterstock_234869317 (1)

 

HELP FEED OUR ANIMALS WITH A SINGLE CLICK THIS SEASON

LIKE”  Ardmore Animal Hospital on Facebook  at www.facebook.com/ArdmoreAnimalHospital

and Francisvale will receive a SCOOP of Royal Canin pet food donated to our shelter!!!

Thanks to Ardmore Animal Hospital and Royal Canin for sponsoring us!

Posted in News

Volunteer Orientation

Monday, December 21st, 2015

Posted in Events, News

Friday, December 4th, 2015

  • Penn Vet Extra

    Finding Farrah a Forever Home

    Table of Contents

    Farrah, a six-year-old German Shepherd mix, was brought to the Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals in March of 2012 as a stray. She was named after Ms. Fawcett for her charming good looks.

    While at the shelter, Farrah exhibited repeated behaviors such as barking, jumping, spinning, and tail biting, making her an excellent candidate for a new partnership between Francisvale and the Animal Behavior Service at Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital.

    Through a special internship at the shelter, Penn Vet’s Dr. M. Leanne Lilly assesses and treats animal residents with behavioral problems. She provides individual behavior case management, which may include behavior modification, environmental modification, and medication, if necessary.

    The goal is to provide quality care for the animals and maximize their adoptability into forever homes. As an added benefit, Penn Vet provides support to adopters by offering three months of post-adoption behavioral counseling.

    Farrah’s Frenzies

    Farrah photo by Jen JovinellyWhen Farrah arrived at Francisvale, she had a tumor on the cornea of her right eye. During her evaluation, she exhibited unusual behavior in the presence of bright lights. Farrah eventually had her eye removed. Thankfully, the tumor was determined to be benign. But Farrah’s sensitivity to light continued.

    When Lilly first met Farrah, she was informed that bright lights, moving reflections, and cell phone flashlights would send her into a frenzy of behaviors: barking, jumping, spinning, and biting her own tail. Other triggers included the sound of a dish touching the counter or kibble hitting a dish.

    “We suspected that, due to the stress of her corneal tumor, Farrah was sensitive to the stimuli of bright moving lights or ‘sparklies,’ as we’ve taken to calling them,” said Lilly.

    These reactions are classified as displacement behaviors: repeated patterned behaviors that do not make sense in their contexts, but function as an outlet for stress, frustration, or conflict. Farrah’s series of barking, jumping, spinning, and tail biting may be related to anticipation of receiving food when she hears the sound of kibble hitting metal dishes. However, much like biting your nails in a doctor’s office in anticipation of bad news, this behavior does not function to change the outcome of the situation. It merely provides an escape valve for the underlying emotion.

    “Because Farrah’s displacement behaviors have specific, consistent triggers or antecedents, her prognosis for management is good,” said Lilly.

    The logical first step was to move Farrah out of the kitchen, where she had chosen to reside after surgery. But Farrah refused to go into other rooms. An attempt to temporarily relocate her to an office during meal preparation went well, until she refused to leave the room for her evening walk.

    Feeling Full

    Since Lilly was unable to avoid all of Farrah’s triggers in the confines of her kitchen environment, she sought to make the stimuli less salient, and minimize the ones she could through environmental and behavioral modification.

    Contact paper was placed on Farrah’s kitchen window to eliminate “sparklies” but maintain light in the kitchen. She was switched to Royal Canin Satiety Support food, which she began receiving in semi-frozen Kongs and puzzle toys. Farrah received these before meal preparation began. This served several functions:

    1. She was rewarded for doing something incompatible with her displacement behaviors.
    2. Her overall arousal was diminished by minimizing frustration in waiting for food, and by providing her a greater sense of satiety.

    Dr. M. Leanne Lilly and Farrah photo by Mary Hunt Davis Photography www.maryhuntdavis.comSatiety is the sense of being full and having consumed sufficient nutrients. Satiety is signaled via neural pathways regarding stomach stretch, the sensation of nutrients entering the intestines, and the presence of glucose in the liver and hormones. Unfortunately, the sense of satiety is not as rapid as other sensations—we’ve all eaten that second helping and then regretted it five to ten minutes later, because it can take ten to fifteen minutes after eating a meal for the full range of effects to reach the brain.

    Satiety levels are set by intake patterns established early in life. In dogs like Farrah who were over-conditioned, these levels can be set inappropriately high.

    “When these dogs are placed on a diet, they may become chronically stressed from feeling constantly hungry. Stress decreases the threshold, or level of a stimulus needed to react,” explained Lilly.

    Farrah also had a peculiar habit of “flopping” onto her side during walks and refusing to go farther in an apparently random fashion. She was not particularly sensitive to weather; though shifts from very bright light to very dark light may give her pause. A little bit of record keeping revealed a fairly clear pattern after a few weeks: Farrah would attempt to return to the house near expected mealtimes, but in the mid-morning hours between breakfast and meal prep, she would saunter around the property for 45 minutes to an hour.

    Farrah’s Future

    Dr. M. Leanne Lilly and Farrah photo by Mary Hunt Davis Photography www.maryhuntdavis.comDuring her sessions with Lilly, Farrah learned how to make eye contact on cue with a person speaking – a task at which she excelled, despite her single eye. Farrah was also taught to touch her nose to an offered palm on cue. These positive reinforcement requests can be used to move her from brightly li?t ?areas to shadows or to interrupt an aroused behavior pattern.

    Lilly and fourth-year Penn Vet students filmed Farrah’s entire routine in September after nearly two months of management, and were unable to elicit more than a few barks and a single spin – even in the presence of cell phone flashlights, kibble distribution, and metal dishes banging on the counter before meal time.

    Farrah is still being managed. Like most behaviors, they cannot be cured. But Lilly has high hopes.

    “In a home setting, Farrah would never have to endure the lengthy meal preparation required for the multitude of animals present at Francisvale,” said Lilly. “Farrah is unlikely to need a high level of management after adoption, which is a big win. Now we just want her to find a forever home.”

    View Farrah’s adoption page here.

    A Unique Collaboration

    Francisvale, located in Radnor, PA, is one of the oldest no-kill shelters in the U.S., providing a temporary home for rescued, unwanted, and abandoned dogs and cats. The goal of the shelter is to place animals in homes for life, offering individuals and families the love and companionship of a healthy, carefully matched pet.

    In addition to providing behavior case management for Francisvale, Lilly is establishing a training program for shelter staff and volunteers. Seminars are held on a variety of topics, including common cues for behavior modification, safe handling, and positive reinforcement. Dr. Carlo Siracusa, Director of the Animal Behavior Service at Penn Vet, also leads educational seminars on dog body language and stress and fear recognition.

    “As a no-kill shelter, Francisvale is home to many dogs and cats that have lived in the facility for several years, like Farrah. This unique collaboration will enhance the welfare of these long-term residents, improve their behavior, and strengthen the training of staff and volunteers,” said Siracusa. “The ultimate goal, of course, is to help animals find their forever homes.”

    Lilly is currently managing 14 canine cases on a range of issues including dog reactivity, harness fear, and confinement anxiety. One of the dogs that Lilly worked with has been adopted and two others have adoptions pending. Francisvale is also home to 40-60 cats at any given time, and Lilly helps manage behavior in the catteries.

    “This partnership presents an extraordinary opportunity to further enrich the lives of the dogs and cats that presently reside at Francisvale and of those who may find themselves at our doors,” said Dorothy Claeys, Executive Director of the Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals. “The collaboration will also provide an incredible educational opportunity for our staff and volunteers who will be working with and learning from the Penn Vet team. It’s truly a win-win for all involved.”

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Sunday, August 16th, 2015

penn

 

Contacts:
Ashley Berke, Director of Communications, 215-898-1475/berke@vet.upenn.edu

John Donges, Communications Coordinator, 215-898-4234/jdonges@vet.upenn.edu

For Immediate Release

Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital and Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals Partner to Maximize Welfare and Adoptability of Pets in Need

 

[August 11, 2015; Philadelphia, PA] – Behavior problems are the leading cause of pet relinquishment. In order to maximize the welfare and adoptability of pets in need of forever homes, animal behavior experts from Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital are partnering with the team at the Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals.

Penn Vet’s Dr. M. Leanne Lilly, DVM, will begin a special internship at the shelter, assessing and treating animal residents with behavioral problems and establishing a training program for shelter staff and volunteers. Together, Penn Vet and the Francisvale team will monitor the progress and long-term outcomes of the program. An added benefit, Penn Vet will provide support to adopters by offering post-adoption behavioral counseling.

“This partnership presents an extraordinary opportunity to further enrich the lives of the dogs and cats that presently reside at Francisvale and of those who may find themselves at our doors,” said Dorothy Claeys, Executive Director of the Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals. “The collaboration will also provide an incredible educational opportunity for our staff and volunteers who will be working with and learning from the Penn Vet team. We cannot imagine a better way to advance Francisvale’s mission than by implementing a program like this to provide each one of our dogs and cats with the best possible chance at finding their forever home.”

“As a no-kill shelter, Francisvale is home to many dogs and cats that have lived in the facility for several years. This unique collaboration will enhance the welfare of these long-term residents, improve their behavior, and strengthen the training of staff and volunteers,” said Dr. Carlo Siracusa, Director of the Animal Behavior Service at Penn Vet’s Ryan Hospital. “The ultimate goal, of course, is to help animals find their forever homes and to reinforce the special bond between people and their pets.” 

About the Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals

Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals, located in Radnor, PA, is one of the oldest no-kill shelters in the U.S., providing a temporary home for rescued, unwanted, and abandoned dogs and cats. The goal of the shelter is to place animals in homes for life, offering individuals and families the love and companionship of a healthy, carefully matched pet. Since opening its doors in 1909, Francisvale has saved the life of tens of thousands of cats and dogs.

About Penn Vet

Penn Vet is a global leader in veterinary medicine education, research, and clinical care. Founded in 1884, Penn Vet is the only veterinary school developed in association with a medical school. The school is a proud member of the One Health Initiative, linking human, animal, and environmental health.

Penn Vet serves a diverse population of animals at its two campuses, which include extensive diagnostic and research laboratories. Ryan Hospital in Philadelphia provides care for dogs, cats, and other domestic/companion animals, handling more than 31,000 patient visits a year. New Bolton Center, Penn Vet’s large-animal hospital on nearly 700 acres in rural Kennett Square, PA, cares for horses and livestock/farm animals. The hospital handles more than 4,000 patient visits a year, while the Field Service treats nearly 36,000 patients at local farms. In addition, New Bolton Center’s campus includes a swine center, working dairy, and poultry unit that provide valuable research for the agriculture industry.

For more information, visit www.vet.upenn.edu.

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Francisvale Foster Care Program

Saturday, August 1st, 2015

We are thrilled to announce that Francisvale’s Foster Care Program is up and running! So if you have been thinking about fostering one of our fabulous furry friends, just click on our “Foster a Pet” page to learn more about this wonderful program. And if you decide that fostering is for you, go to our Foster Application to get the process started.

It is our mission at Francisvale to enrich the lives of all of our animals, whether long term residents or new arrivals, and we are hoping that with the addition of the Foster Care Program, we will be giving them an additional chance at a forever home.

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Francisvale named Best Of The Main Line 2015!!!

Friday, May 29th, 2015

Once again, Francisvale was voted the Best Animal Rescue on the Main Line for 2015 by Main Line Times!!!

Thank you so much for your votes and support!

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Supporting Francisvale Is Quick and Easy!!

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

If you are shopping on Amazon, consider using the link provided for Smile Amazon. Amazon will donate a percentage of your purchase price (for most items) to Francisvale.  It’s an easy way to help make a difference at Francisvale.

Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals

 

Posted in Frontpage News, News

Chester County Life Features Francisvale

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

We want to share a wonderful article written by Susan Shiber which appears in the July/August issue of Chester County Life, “Happiness is a Warm Wonder from Francisvale.” You can read it for yourself here.

Posted in News

We won!!! – Best of the Mainline

Friday, April 4th, 2014

Thank you so much for voting for us!  We are thrilled to be Best of Mainline 2014 Animal Rescue!

Posted in News

Ballet Recital to Benefit Francisvale

Wednesday, May 22nd, 2013

A classical ballet recital in June by students of the Pennsylvania School of Classical Ballet, performing unusual, rarely performed pieces from the classical ballet repertoire, will benefit Francisvale. The performance, on Saturday, June 8, at 2 pm, will be held at Radnor Middle School, 135 S. Wayne Ave. Half of the proceeds from tickets sales for the event will be donated to Francisvale. Please come; you can support animal welfare and the arts. And the performance – lasting about an hour – is a great way to introduce children to the art of classical ballet. Tickets will be available at the door, general admission, cash only, $20. To learn more about the Pennsylvania School of Classical Ballet, located in Wayne, and the June 8 recital, please click here.

Posted in News

Vertex Fitness to Host Fundraising Event to Benefit Franvisvale

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Vertex Fitness Personal Training Studio will host its Third Vertex Fitness Pumped event on May 22 to raise awareness and funding for local non-profits, including Francisvale, that have a direct connection to the studio or its clients. The Pumped event will take place in a special tent set up at the studio’s Bryn Mawr location at 931 Lancaster Ave.

In addition to Francisvale, Vertex has chosen two other non-profits, the Hamels Foundation and the Greater Philadelphia Veterans Network, to receive year-long commitments through sponsorships, cash donations from the Vertex Fitness Pumped event and the Vertex board.

The May 22 event, hosted by Steve Morrison from 93.3 WMMR’s Preston & Steve Show, will include refreshments from area restaurants and a musical program featuring “The Fort Washington School of Rock House Band.” Local vendors will also be on site to give guests an opportunity to shop. A raffle will give attendees an opportunity to win gift baskets filled with items donated by participating organizations and vendors.

Registration begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by the event and raffle from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The event is free, as is the courtesy valet parking.

For more information, contact event coordinator Kaitlin Reilly or Sara Rosenberger at pumped@vertexfit.com.

Posted in News

Reception and Fine Jewelry Raffle Benefit Francisvale

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

Jay Michael Salon and Spa celebrated its Grand Re-Opening in St. Davids on March 3 with a reception to benefit and raise awareness for Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals. The cocktail reception, which raised more than $2,000 for Francisvale,  featured hors d ‘oeuvres provided by Executive Chef Michael Luongo of The Radnor Hotel and desserts by Pastry Chef Amelia Dietrich of Paramour at the Wayne Hotel, as well as a raffle of fine jewelry donated by Bernie Robbins Jewelers. At left, Beth Brooks of Jay Michael Salon and Spa with Francisvale Board Member Rosemarie Monzo and Garret. Read more about it here …

Posted in News

A Tiny Dog with a Big Problem …

Sunday, February 10th, 2013

Dear Friend of Francisvale,

Whenever we welcome a recently rescued pet here at Francisvale, I often catch myself holding my breath. If we’re lucky – whew! – the new arrival comes to us in good health, with a sunny disposition and few bad habits. But when a tiny Shih Tzu named Garrett was rescued not long ago, I knew we weren’t going to be so lucky.

As soon as he arrived, we noticed that he limped badly. It looked like he favored his right front leg. And his head bobbed when he moved – a sure sign of pain, as I’ve come to learn. A trip to the vet confirmed our suspicions: A deformed right front leg has affected his elbow and begun dislocating his shoulder. It’s not uncommon for Shih Tzus to have bone deformities. But Garrett’s problems are outsized for a dog so small.

Garrett shows a bit more spine than I would with such a painful problem. Our volunteers walk him daily, and he gets around as best he can. And considering his painful condition, in the best of spirits, too. In fact, he has proven to be one of the gentlest dogs under our roof, good with children as well as our other lodgers – cats and dogs both. And he never tires of lying comfortably in your lap.

Garrett is lucky in one respect; he came to Francisvale. As a no-kill shelter, Francisvale is committed to assuring that rescued animals like him get the medical attention they need. In Garrett’s case, that means extremely complicated arthroscopic surgery to correct the limb deformity and repair his shoulder.

After we got the good news that Garrett can be helped – whew! – came even more stunning news. Even after the vet’s huge discount, it would cost $5,000 for the surgery – far more than we can afford from our day-to-day budget for routine veterinary care.

It wasn’t long ago that I asked for your help meeting the day-to-day expenses of caring for the 90 abandoned cats and dogs who have found their way to Francisvale – hopefully on their way to happy, adoptive homes. But even with the generous donations we’ve received so far this year, I’m afraid Garrett’s operation will stretch us to the breaking point.

And that’s why I’m writing to you today. You and I share the belief that every animal counts, that even abandoned animals like Garrett deserve to live healthy lives, free from debilitating pain and fear. That’s why I am asking for your extra financial help to get Garrett the care he needs.

Garrett won’t die without surgery. But without it, he’ll be trapped in a life of constant pain and impaired movement. His operation is just a few weeks away, and we haven’t raised nearly enough to pay for it. If you can help, please, click the button below; it’s the quickest and easiest way to help Garrett.

Please, we could really use your extra help right now.

Most sincerely,

Melanie Shain
President, Board of Directors

Posted in News

Pet Portraits Net 20% for Francisvale

Monday, February 4th, 2013

The John H. Ansley Photography Studio in Devon is donating 20% of its animal portrait sales to Francisvale as part of its Annual Winter Pet Promotion. Portraits and fine art scenic landscapes by John H. Ansley are enjoyed throughout the Delaware Valley and hang on walls in homes and offices throughout the world. There are no sitting charges and portraits start as low as $55. Pets of all sizes and varieties are welcome. Check out these Ansley Pet Portraits by clicking here. Or visit the Studio at 219 Lancaster Ave., Devon, PA 19333.

Posted in News

Something to Chew On …

Friday, February 1st, 2013

Often preventable but overlooked tooth and gum problems can spell trouble for even the best-cared-for cats and dogs. That’s why the American Veterinary Medical Association has adopted February as its National Pet Dental Health Month.

“Good pet owners are concerned about their pets’ health and are careful to keep their vaccinations up to date, but may forget about the importance of oral health. Great owners know that this is a big mistake, as periodontal disease is the most common health problem that veterinarians find in pets,” explains Dr. Douglas Aspros, president of the AVMA. Some of the signs your pet might have a problem? Bad breath; frequent pawing or rubbing at the face and/or mouth; a reluctance to eat hard food; red, swollen gums, and brownish teeth are the most common. The AVMA advises taking your pet to the vet if you see any of these.

To help pet owners prevent periodontal disease, the AVMA offers a video providing step-by-step instructions on how to brush your pet’s teeth and a video on periodontal disease. The AVMA website also has a webpage on pet dental health that offers links to an informative podcast and other information resources on pet dental health.

 

Posted in News

2012 Hair Ball Donors

Friday, November 2nd, 2012

With Gratitude to Our Sponsors

The Fox Trot – Sustaining Medical Care

Brindisi Animal Foundation
Pat & Tim O’Toole

The Charleston – Vaccines

The Bryn Mawr Trust Company

The Salsa – Dog Food

Melanie & John Shain

The Cha Cha – Cat Food

Sheena Bowa
John Donnelly
Martha Miele & Bryan T. Davis
J & J Snack Foods
SEI

The Twist – Prescription Foods

Eadeh Enterprises
JoAnne Fredericks
Greenstone Energy
Joe McNally & Christine Lindstrom
RAIT Financial Trust
Mrs. George E. Smith
Mrs. Frank Ware

The Jive – Anti-Lyme Vaccine

Anonymous
Jodi Button & Luke McHale
Edward & Dorothy Carter
Cashman & Associates
Judith Ehrman
Matt & Anne Hamilton
Bob & Barbara Hauptfuhrer
Frederick L. Bissinger Architects
Frank & Melinda Mercurio
David Merriman
Mary & Greg Miller
Newman & Saunders Galleries
Ellen Funk & Ann O’Keefe
Jonathan & Johanna Tyburski
Bonnie & Harvey Weiner

The Rhumba – Heartworm Prevention

6ABC
Joseph F. Ellis
Lynn Goldbenjamin
Keystone Volvo
Margaret Walz

With Gratitude to Our …

Benefactors

Marilyn Faris
Harriette S. & Charles L. Tabas Foundation
Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran

Sponsors

Ardmore Animal Hospital
William Marano & Susan Vincent
Conni & Desmond McDonnell
Ruth Sacco
Jerry Womer

Patrons

Frank & Amy Allen
William Baker & Betty Prange
Cindy Kienzle
Robert Killen
Mr. & Mrs. Eric Noll
Kevin & Claudia Silverang
Philip S. Rosenzweig, Esq.

Auction Donors & Friends

Clay’s Creative Corner Bakery
Denise Bones
333 Belrose
Kelly Finch
A.B. Doran’s
Arlene Murphy
AFS
Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza in Wayne
Sal Romano
Bahama Breeze
Tim O’Brien
Diana Mizer
Braxton’s Animal Works
Cardio Canine
Carol & Perry Apino
Champp’s Restaurant
Chanticleer
Anne Sims
Chris Wheeler
Congressman Pat Meehan
Cutter’s Mill
Denny Moritz
Jack Campbell
Dogma
Dorothy Narwich
Ellen Funk
Farnan Jewelers
Claire Farnan
Fellini Café
Fentimans Beverage
Frank Bennett
Frank Mercurio
Frankie’s Fellini Café
Galileo’s
Frank Chiavoroli
General Warren Inne
Clyde Hailey
George Connell, Jr.
George Lemmon
George Rothaker
Grace’s Nails
Ki Suk Park
Gullifty’s
Heather Hennessey
Jackie Baver
Jay Michael Salon
JoAnne Fredericks
Jodi Button
John Aiken
John Ansley Photography
John Shain
Melanie Shain
Kayla Western
Lucky Duck Toys
Lisa Lestrange
Luke McHale
Act II Playhouse
Jennifer Adams
Albed Rug Company
Cheryl Ames
Armen Cadillac
Bahama Breeze
S.W. Bajus Ltd.
Bendit Family
The Boot
Bridget Steakhouse
Jan Berman
Bob Bukata
Jill Bukata
Nancie Burkett
Dottie Cleary
Amber Cooney
Delaware Valley Tennis Assoc.
The Dental Spa
Elmwood Park Zoo
Susan Ferry
Main Line Engraving
Jan Peters
Main Line Land Rover
Tak Papariello
Margaret Kuo’s
Mary Hunt Davis Photography
Paul Kuo
Newman & Saunders Galleries
Lisa Romano
People’s Light and Theatre
Drew Saunders
Pet Valu
Purrfectplay.com
Pam Wheelock
Riannon Walsh
Bob Moser
Salon D’Artiste
Lorraine Friedberg
Christine Cesarini
Seasons’ 52
Senator Daylin Leach
Sharon Sweeney
Sheena Bowa
Kim Turnbaugh
Sheraton Great Valley
Silverspoon
Harry Deverter & Karen Vento
Ruth Silverberg
Tait Weller & Baker
Tango
Lauren Guttilla
Teresa’s Café
Nancy Schwab
Joe Ellis
The Artful Framer
The Radnor Hotel
Anita Sayers
Amanda Conti
Toppers Spa–Donna Sanno
Kathy Greeley
Toppers Spa–Natalie Villegas
Mary Hunt Davis
Toppers Spa–Patti Lenox
Touché
Conni McDonnell
Unleashed Pet Spa & Boutique
Barbara King
Valley Forge Flowers
Kimberly Riley
Villanova Theatre
Wade’s Cat Trees
Wade Batterton
Wagsworth Manor
Wayne Jewelers
Wayne Reid
Nancy Ganz
General Warren Inn
Giovanni & Pileggi
Chris Graham
Patti Gregory
Rachel Venghte
Hotel Palomar
Ann Johnson
Lisa Kelly
Lisa Kelly Cedar Hollow Inn
Allegro Grille
K.C.’s Alley
Keystone Gardens
Kiehls
Marty Grims
Charlene Nolan
Xilantro
Alberto Prado
Zinni’s of Philadelphia
Carolyn Zinni
Rene Coady
Mary Gingrich
Chris Turse
Maurice Furlong
Barbara Hauptfuhrer
Ann O’Keefe
Betty Prange
Linda Mueller
Margie O’Donnell
Maire Moriarty
Annie Johnson
Mary Ann Jantes
Carolyn Cavallo
Jack Kolton
Jennifer Szychter
Elinor Donahue
Emmet Robinson
Nina Saunders
John Woodcock
Melinda Smith
Susan Guitereau
Susan Fisher
Pat Quattrone
Lisa Contino
David Merriman
Nancy Levine
Conni McDonnell
Lyn Rae Photography
Rosemarie Monzo
Ralph Mazzeo
Martha Miele
Kim Kliamovich
Ann O’Keefe
Basis & Jonathan Pearson
Keith Pension
Keith Petrowski
Art Piano
Pennsylvania School of Classical Dance
Philadelphia Academy of Social Dance
Monograms
Pat Quattrone
Rittenhouse Needlepoint
Greg Ranieri
Mary Beth Ranieri
George Rothaker
Ed Schmitt
Barbara Schwartz
Starr Restaurants
Sweet Salvation Truffles
Topiary
Jim Veghte
White Dog Café
WHIMM Designs
Whittle’s Watch Works
Peter Whittle
Whole Foods
Anne Williamson
Jim Williamson
Patty Wolfe
Xilantro

Posted in News

It’s Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month: Bring Home the Love

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

What do you get when you adopt a senior pet? Some pretty big benefits, according to local senior pet adopters. You get “I-love-you-no-matter-what” devotion. You get a loyal and grateful companion; a mellow buddy by your side; a friend who’s always happy to see you. And the advantages go beyond that.

To celebrate all the good things that senior pets bring to life, Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals, the 103-year-old no-kill shelter in Radnor, and Petfinder, the popular pet adoption site, are celebrating November as Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month. And celebrating is the word. Francisvale adopters who have taken home older pets can tell you it’s a win-win.

More … (more…)

Posted in News

It’s Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month: Bring Home the Love

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

What do you get when you adopt a senior pet? Some pretty big benefits, according to local senior pet adopters. You get “I-love-you-no-matter-what” devotion. You get a loyal and grateful companion; a mellow buddy by your side; a friend who’s always happy to see you. And the advantages go beyond that.

To celebrate all the good things that senior pets bring to life, Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals, the 103-year-old no-kill shelter in Radnor, and Petfinder, the popular pet adoption site, are celebrating November as Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month. And celebrating is the word. Francisvale adopters who have taken home older pets can tell you it’s a win-win.

Susan and George House adopted Grizwold, a 12-year-old Keeshond, to keep their old dog, Elliot, company – and Grizwold “has been brightening our lives ever since,” says Susan. “He’s so happy to have a home; he and Elliot curl up and sleep together. And Grizwold has adopted my husband and follows him everywhere.” Grizwold even helps in the kitchen – cleaning up scraps. “He can’t hear but he has a great sniffer and loves food. He’s just full of love. He’s no trouble and he’s fun to have around.”

Senior animals arrive at shelters for a variety of reasons, says Jodi Button, executive director at Francisvale. “In some cases the owner dies, or there’s a divorce in the family, maybe a change of jobs, a move.” Some may have been rescued from a bad situation, but have survived with spirit and trust intact. “Most have had a home and they want one again,” says Jodi. “At Francisvale we know the animal’s history so we can make the best match for the people and the pet.”
?Many adopters tend to want younger animals, says Heather Hennessy, shelter manager at Francisvale. “But the advantage of a senior pet is – you know what you’re getting. You know their full-grown size, their personality, their grooming needs. And even though some of our older pets have had hard things happen to them,” says Heather, “they’re wonderful souls. They’re quieter and calmer. When an adopter comes along to take them in and give them comfort for their later years,” she observes, “they’re so grateful to you for giving them a home.”

Senior cats and dogs can fit especially well into the lives of older companions. “I like that Mosely is older, because I am too,” says Marie Loughney about the Jack Russell she adopted from Francisvale last summer. After Marie’s beloved dog Flower died, she vowed no more pets. Then she saw Mosely’s story in the newspaper’s “Pets Looking for People” column and thought, “Well, that’s a possibility.” She called Francisvale; met Mosely; it was a match. “I’m glad I did this. He’s such a good companion. “He even puts up with the cats, though he seems to be saying, ‘Gee, they’re not like dogs.’”

Like Mosely and Grizwold, seasoned pets don’t ask for much. Just that one special home to cherish them, a warm place to sleep, good meals and plenty of love. They’re often content just to watch what’s going on in the living room or outside the window.

Felicity, a 16-year-old longhaired black and white cat, got all that and more when Cheryl Frazer and Liesl Woelfel adopted her from Francisvale. “We like to rescue older animals,” says Cheryl. “For one thing, we know they’re less likely to be adopted. And we like mellow, loving, cuddly animals, which older pets tend to be. Felicity is just perfect. We have absolutely fallen in love with her. She’s all love and even sweeter than we imagined. We view her as a gift.”

A golden girl like Felicity is an especially good fit for owners with an active lifestyle. “I drive from place to place on my job all day,” says Cheryl, “so it’s nice to come home to mellow.”

That’s what’s behind Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month: sharing the bounty that older best friends bring to life. Oh, and then there’s the wisdom thing – something Susan House learned from Grizwold. “Dogs are so resilient,” she observes. “Animals don’t look long term. They don’t feel sorry for themselves. They just get on with whatever is happening.”

Like Lucy, an elegant black-and-white longhaired cat who patiently waits at Francisvale for her “retirement home,” having lost her mom to cancer. Lucy positively coos when you pet her. And Myles and Fanny, a pair of Polish Lowland Sheepdogs who find themselves at Francisvale because of a divorce. They may be eight years old, but there’s nothing elderly about these happy, playful beauties.

If you want to adopt a senior pet, call Francisvale at 610-688-1018.

Story: Elinor Donahue
Photos courtesy Mary Hunt Davis Photography.

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Annual Hair Ball Review

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

2012 Hair Ball Donor Listing

For a complete list of 2012 Hair Ball donors, please click here.

Posted in News

Keep your Pet Safe While Enjoying the Festivities of July 4th

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

KEEPING YOUR PETS SAFE ON THE FOURTH OF JULY

It’s the Fourth of July – do you know where your pet is? This may not be the first question that comes to mind on this day of barbecues, picnics, family gatherings and fireworks.

Yet to the American cat and dog, the Fourth of July is a scary holiday – a day of sudden flashes and explosions. Pets don’t realize this is a national holiday. Dogs and cats, who tend be sensitive to noise, become confused and frightened. Often their first instinct is to run and hide.

Many pet owners, unaware of how their pets will react, bring their dogs along to fireworks events or leave their cats outside for the evening. Some owners simply leave a window ajar, not realizing that terrified kitties might think this opening will allow them to escape the noise.

Here are some simple ways to prepare for the holiday, increase your pets’ safety, drastically reduce their stress and lower their risk of running away.

Create a quiet place. Firecrackers, loud party voices and booming music can make pets anxious. Even well-socialized animals are likely to be pushed beyond their limits. Whether you go out or entertain at home, make sure your pets have a restful room or area to which they can retreat.

Don’t take your pets to a fireworks display. Though you might prefer to have your pets’ company, they’ll be happier at home. Secure all potential escape hatches. If you can, leave them in a quiet, sheltered area. To reassure them, you may want to keep a television or radio playing at a normal volume while you’re away.

Keep a harness and leash ready for each dog. If you must be outside with your dogs during fireworks, make sure each one is secure on a leash and harness. Frightened dogs commonly manage to slip out of their collars, and harnesses allow you to fully control your dog.

Don’t leave your dogs outside unattended. Even tethered pups will struggle to get away if startled by noise. Dogs who aren’t tethered may try to dig out of an enclosed yard. Generally, if dogs are afraid and stressed, they will look for a way out.

Be sure your pets wear current ID tags. Clear identification can be a pet’s ticket back home. An ID tag means anyone who finds your pet can get in touch with you right away. Even an indoor cat should wear a breakaway collar with ID in case he slips out. If you don’t have time to get a tag before the holiday, write your pet’s name and your phone number in indelible ink on the collar itself for each of your pets.

Shoot a roll of photographs. It’s a good idea to have up-to-date photos of your pets in case they ever get lost. Take a side shot of each pet and one looking directly at the camera. Hang up a gray sheet as a backdrop so your pets’ images stand out clearly.

Keep all fireworks away from pets. People often don’t realize how unpredictable and dangerous fireworks can be. Bottle rockets and firecrackers, in particular, can fly off in any direction. If one explodes near a pet, it could severely burn or blind him.

Hire a pet-sitter. If you go out for the day or evening, hire a pet-sitter to stop by or ask a friend who knows your pets to pay a visit. The loving touch and soothing tones of an animal-lover can calm your pets during the pyrotechnics.

Posted in News

Keeping our Four-legged Friends Cool in the Summer Heat

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Year-round hot weather tips


Never leave your pets in a parked car.

Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85 degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die. If you see an animal in distress in a parked car, contact the nearest animal shelter or police.

Watch the humidity.

“It’s important to remember that it’s not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet,” says Dr. Barry Kellogg, VMD, of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association. “Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly.”

Taking a dog’s temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Their temperature should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees, If it does, immediate steps need to be taken.

Don’t rely on a fan.

Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don’t cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

Provide ample shade and water.

Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don’t obstruct air flow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

Limit exercise on hot days.

Take care when exercising your pet.  Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets who, because of their short noses, typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet’s paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible.

 

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4th of July Special! July 1st- the 7th

Friday, June 29th, 2012

Fill out an application for a dog or cat the first week in July and the adoption donation is only $4.00!

Pet Safety Tips for the 4th of July

Create a quiet place. Firecrackers, loud party voices and booming music can make pets anxious. Even well-socialized animals are likely to be pushed beyond their limits. Whether you go out or entertain at home, make sure your pets have a restful room or area to which they can retreat.

Don’t take your pets to a fireworks display. Though you might prefer to have your pets’ company, they’ll be happier at home. Secure all potential escape hatches. If you can, leave them in a quiet, sheltered area. To reassure them, you may want to keep a television or radio playing at a normal volume while you’re away.

Don’t leave your dogs outside unattended. Even tethered pups will struggle to get away if startled by noise. Dogs who aren’t tethered may try to dig out of an enclosed yard. Generally, if dogs are afraid and stressed, they will look for a way out.

Be sure your pets wear current ID tags. Clear identification can be a pet’s ticket back home. An ID tag means anyone who finds your pet can get in touch with you right away. Even an indoor cat should wear a breakaway collar with ID in case he slips out. If you don’t have time to get a tag before the holiday, write your pet’s name and your phone number in indelible ink on the collar itself for each of your pets.

Keep all fireworks away from pets. People often don’t realize how unpredictable and dangerous fireworks can be. Bottle rockets and firecrackers, in particular, can fly off in any direction. If one explodes near a pet, it could severely burn or blind him.

Hire a pet-sitter. If you go out for the day or evening, hire a pet-sitter to stop by or ask a friend who knows your pets to pay a visit. The loving touch and soothing tones of an animal-lover can calm your pets during the pyrotechnics.

 

Posted in News

Thank you! We couldn’t have done it without your support!

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

 

We are this week’s Shelter Me winner. Francisvale will be the next to be featured on an Action News broadcast.  A camera crew will be out this week to video some of our awesome animals and the shelter. Here are the air times:

Saturday 30th – 9:30am
Saturday 30th – 7:00pm – FYI Philly
Sunday July 1st -after the 11:00pm news at midnight – FYI Philly Re-Run
Channel 6 Website


We had such a wonderful outpouring of support and we could not thank you enough.


Stay Tuned!

 

 

 


Posted in News

June is Adopt-A-Shelter-Cat-Month

Tuesday, June 5th, 2012

ADOPT ONE CAT AND YOU CAN TAKE HOME A PAL FOR NO ADDITIONAL ADOPTION FEE.

To celebrate this wonderful month we will be having an adoption special. If you adopt one cat you can adopt a second cat for no donation fee.  We love our cats at Francisvale and we are hoping this month to hit a record high with cat adoptions. We have already adopted two in the first week. Let’s keep it going and get some more cats their forever homes.

 

CHECKLIST FOR ADOPTING A CAT

1. If you are thinking about adopting a cat, consider taking home two. Cats do well when they have a buddy.

2. Find a cat whose personality compliments yours. Francisvale has many cats with different personalities.

3. Pick out a veterinarian ahead of time if you don’t already have one, and schedule a visit within the first few days following the adoption.

4. Make sure everyone in the house is prepared to have a cat before it comes home.

5. Budget for the short and long-term costs of a cat.

6. Stock up on supplies before the cat arrives.

7. Cat proof your home.

8. Go slowly when introducing your cat to new people and other pets.

9. Be sure to include your new pet in your family’s emergency plan.

10. Enjoy being a new pet parent!

 

 

Posted in News

Sunday, April 8th, 2012

favorites sparticus precious elsie tiny maddie lulu mosely

Posted in News

Come Meet Our Favorites

Monday, March 19th, 2012

Everyone at Francisvale loves all the wonderful four legged friends that come through the doors, but there is always that one that wins their way into our hearts a little bit more than the rest. We’ve decided to share with you some of our favorite animals in the hopes that our love for them will be passed on and they will find forever homes.

 

 

Executive Director’s Pick.-“Mosely is an adorable, wonderful companion with lovely idiosyncrasies that are a joy to behold. He waits patiently for a lift onto my lap where he rests for endless periods of time while I type away.” Jodi

 

Photographer’s PickMaddie-” This gentle bundle of fur immediately captured my heart as she snuggled up to me with her motor boat purr, a sound like no other.” Mary Hunt Davis
Volunteer Pick-Precious– ” I like Precious because there is not a needy bone in her body. She appreciates whatever attention you can give her.” Carolyn

 

Staff Pick-Sparticus– He is strong, but sensitive. He is a true Gladiator. He has the best qualities of any man! Kim

 

Staff Pick- Lulu-” She is a smart, enthusiastic, fun loving dog. She’s so much fun and would be a great companion.” Amber

 

Intern Pick- “Milo & Otis are a fantastic duo- the two are so sweet and affectionate without being pushy. Two is definitely better than one!” Maire

Shelter Manager Pick-Dougie-“He is a total snuggle bug and he gives the best kisses.” Heather
Staff Pick- Mama(Tiny)– “She is just a wonderful cat. I wish that I could take her home with me.” Sue
Staff Pick-Elsie-“I share an office with Elsie, and after earning her trust, I’m able to see how much her intelligence and affection make her quite a special dog. ” Lisa
Staff Pick-Bo– He is just so incredibly sweet and I think most people don’t get to see this side of him because he’s always on the defense due to all the other cats. He has the best purr ever!-Laura

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in News

Your True Love is Waiting at Francisvale

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Bring Home Double the Love on this Valentines Day

In honor of the holiday of love, Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals will be running a Valentine Special in hopes that some of our loving couples can go to their forever homes together. For the month of February cat adoption donations will be 2 for 1. Adopt one cat and if you choose to adopt a friend there will be no adoption donation for that second animal.

 

 

Take a look at our best friends

 

Lacey & Bo. Lacey is the only cat that Bo will let into his heart

 

Milo and Otis-Two brothers waiting to make you smile all year round.

 

Lady Buttons & Missy- Sweet and Beautiful Sisters

All in the Family

 

Tiny- Mama of the 3 stunning cats below

 

Bubbles


Dizzy

Sprinkles

 

Any combination of this family will bring much love and happiness to your home.

Posted in News

New Email Addresses

Wednesday, January 25th, 2012

*Please see our new email addresses on the Contact Us page.*

Posted in News

Holiday Safety Tips From Your Friends at Francisvale

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

Tinsel-less Town
Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching “toy” that’s easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It’s best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

No Feasting for the Furries
By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

Toy Joy
Looking to stuff your pet’s stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines.

Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.Long, stringy things are a feline’s dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery.

Surprise kitty with a new ball that’s too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

Forget the Mistletoe & Holly
Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

Leave the Leftovers
Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won’t lead to costly medical bills.

That Holiday Glow
Don’t leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

Wired Up
Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws’ reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet’s mouth.

 

 


 

*Courtesy of the ASPCA

Posted in News

Join Francisvale at the 2nd Annual Shirley’s Run and Dog Walk

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2011

Presented by the Maple Glen Community Association

August 21st, 2011

8:30am-10:30am

For Runners: Only $20 until August 8th. ($10 for ages 19 and under)

For Dogs and their escorts: Only $10 until August 8th

For Both the Run and Dog Walk: Only $25 until August 8th

(Pet Sitters will be available to hold your dog while you participate in the run)

In her memory Shirley’s Run raises funds for the Shirley Schriftman Fund for Animals; a donor advised fund at the Montgomery County Foundation.

www.mcfoundationinc.org

The fund supports animal rescue and animal training organizations in the Montgomery County area.

For more information contact Ross Schriftman @ 215-682-7075 or rfs270@aol.com

To volunteer, donate or sponsor: Contact Ross Schriftman

Posted in News

June is Adopt a Shelter Cat Month

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

 

Join Our Effort to Get Cats Adopted!

 

It’s  estimated that more than four million cats and kittens enter animal shelters nationwide each year. To help find loving homes for cats, Francisvale is waiving its adoption fee for all cats for the month of June. Pass the word around and help us get these kitties adopted.

 

“TOP TEN” CHECKLIST FOR ADOPTING A CAT 

1. If you’re thinking about adopting a cat, consider taking home two.

2. Find a cat whose personality meshes with yours.

3. Pick out a veterinarian ahead of time and schedule a visit within the first few days following the adoption.

4. Make sure everyone in the house is prepared to have a cat and is involved in the adoption process.

5. Budget for the short and long-term costs of a cat.

6. Stock up on supplies before the cat arrives.

7. Cat-proof your home.

8. Keep your new cat in one room for the first couple of days to get him use to his new surroundings.

9.Go slowly when introducing your cat to new friends, family, and other pets.

10. Have patience and give plenty of love.

Francisvale has many wonderful cats that need a loving homes to call their own. Please take a look at our adoptable cat section and fill out an application today.  You will have a devoted companion for life. They will be waiting!

Posted in News

An Evening with the DePue Brothers Band

Tuesday, April 5th, 2011

To Benefit Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals

The Colonial Theatre

Phoenixville, PA

Francisvale_Benefit_Concert[1]

 

Join the DePue Brothers Band and special guest host, Keith Brand of WXPN’s Sleepy Hollow for an astounding evening of  ‘grassical’ experience as these 7 nationally heralded classically and jazz trained musicians bring us an evening of Bluegrass Fusion! Special guest banjo player Tony Trishka will be with the band for the 2011 benefit concert.

Every ticket sold benefits Francisvale and the wonderful work they have been doing as America’s oldest continuously operating no-kill shelter for over 100 years right here in our own Delaware Valley.

Treat yourself and friends to VIP level tickets(premier seating) and receive invitations to the after concert party upstairs at the Colonial and take home an autographed compy of the Depue Brothers CD, ‘Weapons of Grass Destruction’ as part of your VIP package! Drinks and Desserts on the band and a meet and greet with ‘the boys’ themselves. VIP tickets are limited!!

Tickets on sale at  www.thecolonialtheatre.com

 

Our thanks go out to our growing list of sponsors!

Frist Priority Bank

AFS(Automated Financial Systems, Inc.)

CelticMalts, Inc.

The Colonial Theatre

Keith Brand/WXPN

Compass Box Whisky

High West Distillery

**want to become a sponsor of this important annual benefit? Please phone Riannon Walsh on 610-986-6511 to discuss sponsor levels and benefits.

 

Visit and preview the Band:

www.depuebrothersband.com

 

 

Posted in News

Noisemakers of the Year!

Monday, December 20th, 2010

 

Congratulations to Kim Wolf for being recognized for the work she does with Sarge for animal welfare, outreach and humane education. We couldn’t ask for a nicer more caring person to be representing pitbulls and all  of the animals in our community. Way to go Kim!

http://www.philadelphiaweekly.com/news-and-opinion/cover-story/Noisemakers-of-the-Year.html

Posted in News

Francisvale Fall 2010 Newsletter

Friday, November 12th, 2010

Keep up to date with everything that is going on at Francisvale! To download the latest edition of our newsletter: September 2010 newsletter

Posted in News

Pets of the Week


We specialize in personal adoptions and placement.

Hours of operation:

  • Adoptions & Surrenders:
    Monday to Sunday by appointment only.
  • Cemetery:
    Monday to Sunday, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.
  • Donation Drop Off:
    Monday to Friday, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.