Francisvale News

Pet Portraits Net 20% for Francisvale

Posted on: Monday, February 4, 2013

The John H. Ansley Photography Studio in Devon is donating 20% of its animal portrait sales to Francisvale as part of its Annual Winter Pet Promotion. Portraits and fine art scenic landscapes by John H. Ansley are enjoyed throughout the Delaware Valley and hang on walls in homes and offices throughout the world. There are no sitting charges and portraits start as low as $55. Pets of all sizes and varieties are welcome. Check out these Ansley Pet Portraits by clicking here. Or visit the Studio at 219 Lancaster Ave., Devon, PA 19333.


Something to Chew On …

Posted on: Friday, February 1, 2013

Often preventable but overlooked tooth and gum problems can spell trouble for even the best-cared-for cats and dogs. That’s why the American Veterinary Medical Association has adopted February as its National Pet Dental Health Month.

“Good pet owners are concerned about their pets’ health and are careful to keep their vaccinations up to date, but may forget about the importance of oral health. Great owners know that this is a big mistake, as periodontal disease is the most common health problem that veterinarians find in pets,” explains Dr. Douglas Aspros, president of the AVMA. Some of the signs your pet might have a problem? Bad breath; frequent pawing or rubbing at the face and/or mouth; a reluctance to eat hard food; red, swollen gums, and brownish teeth are the most common. The AVMA advises taking your pet to the vet if you see any of these.

To help pet owners prevent periodontal disease, the AVMA offers a video providing step-by-step instructions on how to brush your pet’s teeth and a video on periodontal disease. The AVMA website also has a webpage on pet dental health that offers links to an informative podcast and other information resources on pet dental health.

 


2012 Hair Ball Donors

Posted on: Friday, November 2, 2012

With Gratitude to Our Sponsors

The Fox Trot – Sustaining Medical Care

Brindisi Animal Foundation
Pat & Tim O’Toole

The Charleston – Vaccines

The Bryn Mawr Trust Company

The Salsa – Dog Food

Melanie & John Shain

The Cha Cha – Cat Food

Sheena Bowa
John Donnelly
Martha Miele & Bryan T. Davis
J & J Snack Foods
SEI

The Twist – Prescription Foods

Eadeh Enterprises
JoAnne Fredericks
Greenstone Energy
Joe McNally & Christine Lindstrom
RAIT Financial Trust
Mrs. George E. Smith
Mrs. Frank Ware

The Jive – Anti-Lyme Vaccine

Anonymous
Jodi Button & Luke McHale
Edward & Dorothy Carter
Cashman & Associates
Judith Ehrman
Matt & Anne Hamilton
Bob & Barbara Hauptfuhrer
Frederick L. Bissinger Architects
Frank & Melinda Mercurio
David Merriman
Mary & Greg Miller
Newman & Saunders Galleries
Ellen Funk & Ann O’Keefe
Jonathan & Johanna Tyburski
Bonnie & Harvey Weiner

The Rhumba – Heartworm Prevention

6ABC
Joseph F. Ellis
Lynn Goldbenjamin
Keystone Volvo
Margaret Walz

With Gratitude to Our …

Benefactors

Marilyn Faris
Harriette S. & Charles L. Tabas Foundation
Mrs. J. Maxwell Moran

Sponsors

Ardmore Animal Hospital
William Marano & Susan Vincent
Conni & Desmond McDonnell
Ruth Sacco
Jerry Womer

Patrons

Frank & Amy Allen
William Baker & Betty Prange
Cindy Kienzle
Robert Killen
Mr. & Mrs. Eric Noll
Kevin & Claudia Silverang
Philip S. Rosenzweig, Esq.

Auction Donors & Friends

Clay’s Creative Corner Bakery
Denise Bones
333 Belrose
Kelly Finch
A.B. Doran’s
Arlene Murphy
AFS
Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza in Wayne
Sal Romano
Bahama Breeze
Tim O’Brien
Diana Mizer
Braxton’s Animal Works
Cardio Canine
Carol & Perry Apino
Champp’s Restaurant
Chanticleer
Anne Sims
Chris Wheeler
Congressman Pat Meehan
Cutter’s Mill
Denny Moritz
Jack Campbell
Dogma
Dorothy Narwich
Ellen Funk
Farnan Jewelers
Claire Farnan
Fellini Café
Fentimans Beverage
Frank Bennett
Frank Mercurio
Frankie’s Fellini Café
Galileo’s
Frank Chiavoroli
General Warren Inne
Clyde Hailey
George Connell, Jr.
George Lemmon
George Rothaker
Grace’s Nails
Ki Suk Park
Gullifty’s
Heather Hennessey
Jackie Baver
Jay Michael Salon
JoAnne Fredericks
Jodi Button
John Aiken
John Ansley Photography
John Shain
Melanie Shain
Kayla Western
Lucky Duck Toys
Lisa Lestrange
Luke McHale
Act II Playhouse
Jennifer Adams
Albed Rug Company
Cheryl Ames
Armen Cadillac
Bahama Breeze
S.W. Bajus Ltd.
Bendit Family
The Boot
Bridget Steakhouse
Jan Berman
Bob Bukata
Jill Bukata
Nancie Burkett
Dottie Cleary
Amber Cooney
Delaware Valley Tennis Assoc.
The Dental Spa
Elmwood Park Zoo
Susan Ferry
Main Line Engraving
Jan Peters
Main Line Land Rover
Tak Papariello
Margaret Kuo’s
Mary Hunt Davis Photography
Paul Kuo
Newman & Saunders Galleries
Lisa Romano
People’s Light and Theatre
Drew Saunders
Pet Valu
Purrfectplay.com
Pam Wheelock
Riannon Walsh
Bob Moser
Salon D’Artiste
Lorraine Friedberg
Christine Cesarini
Seasons’ 52
Senator Daylin Leach
Sharon Sweeney
Sheena Bowa
Kim Turnbaugh
Sheraton Great Valley
Silverspoon
Harry Deverter & Karen Vento
Ruth Silverberg
Tait Weller & Baker
Tango
Lauren Guttilla
Teresa’s Café
Nancy Schwab
Joe Ellis
The Artful Framer
The Radnor Hotel
Anita Sayers
Amanda Conti
Toppers Spa–Donna Sanno
Kathy Greeley
Toppers Spa–Natalie Villegas
Mary Hunt Davis
Toppers Spa–Patti Lenox
Touché
Conni McDonnell
Unleashed Pet Spa & Boutique
Barbara King
Valley Forge Flowers
Kimberly Riley
Villanova Theatre
Wade’s Cat Trees
Wade Batterton
Wagsworth Manor
Wayne Jewelers
Wayne Reid
Nancy Ganz
General Warren Inn
Giovanni & Pileggi
Chris Graham
Patti Gregory
Rachel Venghte
Hotel Palomar
Ann Johnson
Lisa Kelly
Lisa Kelly Cedar Hollow Inn
Allegro Grille
K.C.’s Alley
Keystone Gardens
Kiehls
Marty Grims
Charlene Nolan
Xilantro
Alberto Prado
Zinni’s of Philadelphia
Carolyn Zinni
Rene Coady
Mary Gingrich
Chris Turse
Maurice Furlong
Barbara Hauptfuhrer
Ann O’Keefe
Betty Prange
Linda Mueller
Margie O’Donnell
Maire Moriarty
Annie Johnson
Mary Ann Jantes
Carolyn Cavallo
Jack Kolton
Jennifer Szychter
Elinor Donahue
Emmet Robinson
Nina Saunders
John Woodcock
Melinda Smith
Susan Guitereau
Susan Fisher
Pat Quattrone
Lisa Contino
David Merriman
Nancy Levine
Conni McDonnell
Lyn Rae Photography
Rosemarie Monzo
Ralph Mazzeo
Martha Miele
Kim Kliamovich
Ann O’Keefe
Basis & Jonathan Pearson
Keith Pension
Keith Petrowski
Art Piano
Pennsylvania School of Classical Dance
Philadelphia Academy of Social Dance
Monograms
Pat Quattrone
Rittenhouse Needlepoint
Greg Ranieri
Mary Beth Ranieri
George Rothaker
Ed Schmitt
Barbara Schwartz
Starr Restaurants
Sweet Salvation Truffles
Topiary
Jim Veghte
White Dog Café
WHIMM Designs
Whittle’s Watch Works
Peter Whittle
Whole Foods
Anne Williamson
Jim Williamson
Patty Wolfe
Xilantro

It’s Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month: Bring Home the Love

Posted on: Thursday, November 1, 2012

What do you get when you adopt a senior pet? Some pretty big benefits, according to local senior pet adopters. You get “I-love-you-no-matter-what” devotion. You get a loyal and grateful companion; a mellow buddy by your side; a friend who’s always happy to see you. And the advantages go beyond that.

To celebrate all the good things that senior pets bring to life, Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals, the 103-year-old no-kill shelter in Radnor, and Petfinder, the popular pet adoption site, are celebrating November as Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month. And celebrating is the word. Francisvale adopters who have taken home older pets can tell you it’s a win-win.

More …

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It’s Adopt-a-Senior-Pet Month: Bring Home the Love

Posted on:

What do you get when you adopt a senior pet? Some pretty big benefits, according to local senior pet adopters. You get “I-love-you-no-matter-what” devotion. You get a loyal and grateful companion; a mellow buddy by your side; a friend who’s always happy to see you. And the advantages go beyond that.

To celebrate all the good things that senior pets bring to life, Francisvale Home for Smaller Animals, the 103-year-old no-kill shelter in Radnor, and Petfinder, the popular pet adoption site, are celebrating November as Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month. And celebrating is the word. Francisvale adopters who have taken home older pets can tell you it’s a win-win.

Susan and George House adopted Grizwold, a 12-year-old Keeshond, to keep their old dog, Elliot, company – and Grizwold “has been brightening our lives ever since,” says Susan. “He’s so happy to have a home; he and Elliot curl up and sleep together. And Grizwold has adopted my husband and follows him everywhere.” Grizwold even helps in the kitchen – cleaning up scraps. “He can’t hear but he has a great sniffer and loves food. He’s just full of love. He’s no trouble and he’s fun to have around.”

Senior animals arrive at shelters for a variety of reasons, says Jodi Button, executive director at Francisvale. “In some cases the owner dies, or there’s a divorce in the family, maybe a change of jobs, a move.” Some may have been rescued from a bad situation, but have survived with spirit and trust intact. “Most have had a home and they want one again,” says Jodi. “At Francisvale we know the animal’s history so we can make the best match for the people and the pet.”
?Many adopters tend to want younger animals, says Heather Hennessy, shelter manager at Francisvale. “But the advantage of a senior pet is – you know what you’re getting. You know their full-grown size, their personality, their grooming needs. And even though some of our older pets have had hard things happen to them,” says Heather, “they’re wonderful souls. They’re quieter and calmer. When an adopter comes along to take them in and give them comfort for their later years,” she observes, “they’re so grateful to you for giving them a home.”

Senior cats and dogs can fit especially well into the lives of older companions. “I like that Mosely is older, because I am too,” says Marie Loughney about the Jack Russell she adopted from Francisvale last summer. After Marie’s beloved dog Flower died, she vowed no more pets. Then she saw Mosely’s story in the newspaper’s “Pets Looking for People” column and thought, “Well, that’s a possibility.” She called Francisvale; met Mosely; it was a match. “I’m glad I did this. He’s such a good companion. “He even puts up with the cats, though he seems to be saying, ‘Gee, they’re not like dogs.’”

Like Mosely and Grizwold, seasoned pets don’t ask for much. Just that one special home to cherish them, a warm place to sleep, good meals and plenty of love. They’re often content just to watch what’s going on in the living room or outside the window.

Felicity, a 16-year-old longhaired black and white cat, got all that and more when Cheryl Frazer and Liesl Woelfel adopted her from Francisvale. “We like to rescue older animals,” says Cheryl. “For one thing, we know they’re less likely to be adopted. And we like mellow, loving, cuddly animals, which older pets tend to be. Felicity is just perfect. We have absolutely fallen in love with her. She’s all love and even sweeter than we imagined. We view her as a gift.”

A golden girl like Felicity is an especially good fit for owners with an active lifestyle. “I drive from place to place on my job all day,” says Cheryl, “so it’s nice to come home to mellow.”

That’s what’s behind Adopt-A-Senior-Pet Month: sharing the bounty that older best friends bring to life. Oh, and then there’s the wisdom thing – something Susan House learned from Grizwold. “Dogs are so resilient,” she observes. “Animals don’t look long term. They don’t feel sorry for themselves. They just get on with whatever is happening.”

Like Lucy, an elegant black-and-white longhaired cat who patiently waits at Francisvale for her “retirement home,” having lost her mom to cancer. Lucy positively coos when you pet her. And Myles and Fanny, a pair of Polish Lowland Sheepdogs who find themselves at Francisvale because of a divorce. They may be eight years old, but there’s nothing elderly about these happy, playful beauties.

If you want to adopt a senior pet, call Francisvale at 610-688-1018.

Story: Elinor Donahue
Photos courtesy Mary Hunt Davis Photography.


Annual Hair Ball Review

Posted on: Tuesday, October 30, 2012

2012 Hair Ball Donor Listing

For a complete list of 2012 Hair Ball donors, please click here.


Keep your Pet Safe While Enjoying the Festivities of July 4th

Posted on: Tuesday, July 10, 2012

KEEPING YOUR PETS SAFE ON THE FOURTH OF JULY

It’s the Fourth of July – do you know where your pet is? This may not be the first question that comes to mind on this day of barbecues, picnics, family gatherings and fireworks.

Yet to the American cat and dog, the Fourth of July is a scary holiday – a day of sudden flashes and explosions. Pets don’t realize this is a national holiday. Dogs and cats, who tend be sensitive to noise, become confused and frightened. Often their first instinct is to run and hide.

Many pet owners, unaware of how their pets will react, bring their dogs along to fireworks events or leave their cats outside for the evening. Some owners simply leave a window ajar, not realizing that terrified kitties might think this opening will allow them to escape the noise.

Here are some simple ways to prepare for the holiday, increase your pets’ safety, drastically reduce their stress and lower their risk of running away.

Create a quiet place. Firecrackers, loud party voices and booming music can make pets anxious. Even well-socialized animals are likely to be pushed beyond their limits. Whether you go out or entertain at home, make sure your pets have a restful room or area to which they can retreat.

Don’t take your pets to a fireworks display. Though you might prefer to have your pets’ company, they’ll be happier at home. Secure all potential escape hatches. If you can, leave them in a quiet, sheltered area. To reassure them, you may want to keep a television or radio playing at a normal volume while you’re away.

Keep a harness and leash ready for each dog. If you must be outside with your dogs during fireworks, make sure each one is secure on a leash and harness. Frightened dogs commonly manage to slip out of their collars, and harnesses allow you to fully control your dog.

Don’t leave your dogs outside unattended. Even tethered pups will struggle to get away if startled by noise. Dogs who aren’t tethered may try to dig out of an enclosed yard. Generally, if dogs are afraid and stressed, they will look for a way out.

Be sure your pets wear current ID tags. Clear identification can be a pet’s ticket back home. An ID tag means anyone who finds your pet can get in touch with you right away. Even an indoor cat should wear a breakaway collar with ID in case he slips out. If you don’t have time to get a tag before the holiday, write your pet’s name and your phone number in indelible ink on the collar itself for each of your pets.

Shoot a roll of photographs. It’s a good idea to have up-to-date photos of your pets in case they ever get lost. Take a side shot of each pet and one looking directly at the camera. Hang up a gray sheet as a backdrop so your pets’ images stand out clearly.

Keep all fireworks away from pets. People often don’t realize how unpredictable and dangerous fireworks can be. Bottle rockets and firecrackers, in particular, can fly off in any direction. If one explodes near a pet, it could severely burn or blind him.

Hire a pet-sitter. If you go out for the day or evening, hire a pet-sitter to stop by or ask a friend who knows your pets to pay a visit. The loving touch and soothing tones of an animal-lover can calm your pets during the pyrotechnics.


Keeping our Four-legged Friends Cool in the Summer Heat

Posted on:

Year-round hot weather tips


Never leave your pets in a parked car.

Not even for a minute. Not even with the car running and air conditioner on. On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85 degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die. If you see an animal in distress in a parked car, contact the nearest animal shelter or police.

Watch the humidity.

“It’s important to remember that it’s not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet,” says Dr. Barry Kellogg, VMD, of the Humane Society Veterinary Medical Association. “Animals pant to evaporate moisture from their lungs, which takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high, they are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature will skyrocket to dangerous levels—very quickly.”

Taking a dog’s temperature will quickly tell you if there is a serious problem. Their temperature should not be allowed to get over 104 degrees, If it does, immediate steps need to be taken.

Don’t rely on a fan.

Pets respond differently to heat than humans do. (Dogs, for instance, sweat primarily through their feet.) And fans don’t cool off pets as effectively as they do people.

Provide ample shade and water.

Any time your pet is outside, make sure he or she has protection from heat and sun and plenty of fresh, cold water. In heat waves, add ice to water when possible. Tree shade and tarps are ideal because they don’t obstruct air flow. A doghouse does not provide relief from heat—in fact, it makes it worse.

Limit exercise on hot days.

Take care when exercising your pet.  Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours, and be especially careful with pets with white-colored ears, who are more susceptible to skin cancer, and short-nosed pets who, because of their short noses, typically have difficulty breathing. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet’s paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible.

 


4th of July Special! July 1st- the 7th

Posted on: Friday, June 29, 2012

Fill out an application for a dog or cat the first week in July and the adoption donation is only $4.00!

Pet Safety Tips for the 4th of July

Create a quiet place. Firecrackers, loud party voices and booming music can make pets anxious. Even well-socialized animals are likely to be pushed beyond their limits. Whether you go out or entertain at home, make sure your pets have a restful room or area to which they can retreat.

Don’t take your pets to a fireworks display. Though you might prefer to have your pets’ company, they’ll be happier at home. Secure all potential escape hatches. If you can, leave them in a quiet, sheltered area. To reassure them, you may want to keep a television or radio playing at a normal volume while you’re away.

Don’t leave your dogs outside unattended. Even tethered pups will struggle to get away if startled by noise. Dogs who aren’t tethered may try to dig out of an enclosed yard. Generally, if dogs are afraid and stressed, they will look for a way out.

Be sure your pets wear current ID tags. Clear identification can be a pet’s ticket back home. An ID tag means anyone who finds your pet can get in touch with you right away. Even an indoor cat should wear a breakaway collar with ID in case he slips out. If you don’t have time to get a tag before the holiday, write your pet’s name and your phone number in indelible ink on the collar itself for each of your pets.

Keep all fireworks away from pets. People often don’t realize how unpredictable and dangerous fireworks can be. Bottle rockets and firecrackers, in particular, can fly off in any direction. If one explodes near a pet, it could severely burn or blind him.

Hire a pet-sitter. If you go out for the day or evening, hire a pet-sitter to stop by or ask a friend who knows your pets to pay a visit. The loving touch and soothing tones of an animal-lover can calm your pets during the pyrotechnics.

 


Thank you! We couldn’t have done it without your support!

Posted on: Tuesday, June 5, 2012

 

We are this week’s Shelter Me winner. Francisvale will be the next to be featured on an Action News broadcast.  A camera crew will be out this week to video some of our awesome animals and the shelter. Here are the air times:

Saturday 30th – 9:30am
Saturday 30th – 7:00pm – FYI Philly
Sunday July 1st -after the 11:00pm news at midnight – FYI Philly Re-Run
Channel 6 Website


We had such a wonderful outpouring of support and we could not thank you enough.


Stay Tuned!

 

 

 



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Pets of the Week


We specialize in personal adoptions and placement.

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